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Where did we originate from?
PostPosted: Wed Nov 17, 2004 2:58 am Reply with quote
Amaley
Joined: 17 Nov 2004
Posts: 1




I was wondering, where most Harari's are from. There are many such as myself that are mixed, whether it is Somali, Arab etc. I mean we were all "Gey Usu", but where did most of those people originate from. I think that most of us kind of forget that we have so many different cultures that make up being a harari today. Thats one of aspect that most of us youth aren't really informed about, considering that a group of us are mixed it would be nice to know that there were those that came before us that were as well. Very Happy

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PostPosted: Sat Nov 20, 2004 11:57 am Reply with quote
malasay
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That's an interesting question. I have heard different theories about where Hararis originated from. Insha'Allah will address that soon.

However, historically Hararis have intermarried with Muslims from different part of Ethiopia as well as the world.

For example i have somali and arab blood thru my mom's side, and tigre blood thru my dad's side... or that is what i have been told. But I'm 100% Malasay Idea

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Re: Where did we originate from?
PostPosted: Sat Nov 20, 2004 11:38 pm Reply with quote
Original_BadiYA
Joined: 22 Oct 2004
Posts: 129
Location: Last seen in sept.




To the best of my limited knowledge, Our ancestors were a mixture people (from different backgrounds)who happend to live in one city. After so many years of intermarriage they became one and formed their own language and culture based on their islamic belief (correct me if am wrong) . okkk.... I'll let the Historians and those who know more give us a detailed info.
but I think I can sort of prove the above comment just by looking at my own family, neither my mother or my father (and their parents) are pure Hararis; just like you, malasay and so many other Hararis out there I know. Confused
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PostPosted: Mon Nov 22, 2004 2:48 pm Reply with quote
Original_BadiYA
Joined: 22 Oct 2004
Posts: 129
Location: Last seen in sept.




I forgot to mention, whatever the case--- I am the original one and I originated from the Original place.
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Re: where did we originate from
PostPosted: Wed Nov 24, 2004 10:40 pm Reply with quote
Original_BadiYA
Joined: 22 Oct 2004
Posts: 129
Location: Last seen in sept.




Biraq wrote:
To mention some of indigenous tribes Hadara, Nechih Afer, Gidaya, Harla, Silte etc.
.



Do these tribes still exist ? Who are the Hadara's nechih afer and Gidaya?
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Re: where did we originate from
PostPosted: Wed Nov 24, 2004 10:45 pm Reply with quote
malasay
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Original_BadiYA wrote:
Biraq wrote:
To mention some of indigenous tribes Hadara, Nechih Afer, Gidaya, Harla, Silte etc.
.



Do these tribes still exist ? Who are the Hadara's nechih afer and Gidaya?


I don't know about the others, but i know silte's do exist, and many people confuse them to being gurage's... but like brother biraq indicated they are Hararis.

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PostPosted: Thu Jan 13, 2005 8:03 pm Reply with quote
malasay
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Anonymous wrote:
Question How can I get more info on Seltes


I did quick search over the internet, and here is what i found out...
http://www.fbcpg.org/Silte.htm

Quote:


Who are the Silt'e people?

?The Silt'e people are a Muslim nation of people who live southwest of Addis Ababa, Ethiopia.? There are approximately 1,000,000 people who speak the Silt'e language of which 800,000 live in the Silt'e zone of the Southern Nations People state.? The Silt'e zone encompasses an area equal to about six U.S. counties.? The Silt'e people, who are 99.99% Muslim, are a gracious people who follow the Islamic rule for hospitality.

The language of the Silt'e belongs to the Semitic family and is related to Arabic, Hararghe and ancient languages from Yemen.? The language, called Siltingnya, is unintelligible to the surrounding tribes of Gurage, Oromo and Hadiya.

Like many Ethiopians the majority of the Silt'e people are dependant upon agriculture, growing teff, barley, maize, wheat, sorghum, ensette trees, sugar cane, and chat.? The majority of the farmers grow their crops on small one to two acre plots using primitive methods.? Teff is a grain rich in iron and indigenous to Ethiopia.? The tiny grain grown almost exclusively in Ethiopia is used for making the Ethiopian staple bread called injera.? Ensette is common in the highlands southeast of Addis Ababa.? The bulb of the plant is used to make kocho, another bread indigenous to Ethiopia.? Chat is a mildly narcotic plant used primarily by Muslim people in the Horn of Africa.

In 2001 the Silt'e people voted to become independent of the Gurage administrative zone.? Previously they had been part of the eleven Gurage houses (tribes).? This independence should allow the Silt'e people the opportunity to promote their own identity and the needs of the people.? Historically the Silt'e people have been identified with the Hadya and the Gurage tribes.?

The Silt'e people originally came into the area around 1300-1400 CE settling in the Wulbarag area as Muslim traders.? The history of the Silt'e language is somewhat of a mystery, but there are similarities to Haraghe, the language of the ancient Muslim city of Harare in eastern Ethiopia.? Possibly the language originated from a now extinct language on the Arabian Peninsula.

The first settlers came to the Wulbarag area as traders and possibly as an outpost of Muslim sultanate.? A second and better-known wave of settlers came during the time of Mohammed Gragn around 1542.? Mohammed Gragn began a jihad against the people of Ethiopia? underwritten by the Turks who provided guns and promised riches.? Gragn recruited soldiers from Somalia and Harare and then raided the Orthodox areas of destroying and incredible wealth of historical artifacts and taking immeasurable gold.? On Gragn's final campaign the Turks recruited soldiers from the Yemen, Somalia and Harare but Gragn was killed in the battle.? Many of his soldiers returned to the Silt'e area.

Religion - The religion of the Silt'e people is Sunni Islam with few exceptions.? The Silt'e people have a saying, ?Silt'e is Islam and Islam is Silt'e.?? A large number of the Silt'e population follow the teachings of Sheik Nur Hussein, who is an Ethiopian Muslim saint from the 13th century.? His base was in the Bali region near the Sof Omar caves and the site is still revered for religious Hajj.? Many of the Silt'e people pray to Allah through Sheik Nur Hussein for blessings on their crops and family.? The Silt'e holidays are common to most Muslims but the most celebrated holidays are listed here:

Mawlid al-Nabi ? ????? birth of Mohammed

Ramadan

Laylit al-Qadr???????????night of power during Ramadan

Eid al-Fitr????????????????feast for breaking of the Ramadan fast

Eid al-Adha????????????? commemorates Abraham's willingness and obedience to sacrifice his son Ishmael to God (and God's mercy in substituting a lamb for Ishmael)

The most important holiday for the Silt'e people is Eid al-Adha, when everyone travels to their home place to visit family bringing gifts to their parents.? After a gift is given the parents will bless their offspring for another year.? In the mountains this celebration can last for as long as a month during which time many sheep, goats and cattle are slaughtered for feasting.

Economic conditions ? The Silt'e people are extremely poor earning on average around $108 per year, well below the national average for Ethiopia which is one of the ten poorest countries in the world.? It is estimated that over 80% of Ethiopian children suffer from malnutrition at some point in their lives.? One study in the Silt'e zone discovered that the Silt'e children will suffer from malnutrition for three months of each year prior to harvest.

HIV/AIDS has also become a significant problem in the Silt'e zone.? According to UNICEF the virus infects approximately 10% of Ethiopians.? Most deaths are caused by malaria or tuberculosis, but in AIDS weakened people.? The disease carries a tremendous stigma that will continue to affect the family long after someone dies.? In the Silt'e zone there is only one HIV testing site for 800,000 people who live in the zone.? Orphans and widows are becoming an increasing strain on the indigenous welfare system that is already stretched past capacity.

Interesting Note - Some Silt'e claim that Bilal, the freed slave and close friend of the prophet Mohammed, was a native of the Silt'e area.? Bilal would not have been Silt'e since he predates the arrival of the Silt'e people.

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PostPosted: Thu Jan 13, 2005 8:07 pm Reply with quote
malasay
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http://wwwsoc.nii.ac.jp/africa/htmls/summary/v63/nishi.html

Quote:
Making and Unmaking of the Nation State and Ethnicity in Modern Ethiopia: A study on the History of Silte People

Since the end of 19th century, it was politically imperative for Ethiopia to build a modern state with a unified nation. However, after three decades of civil war, Ethiopia was transformed into a "federation of ethnic groups" in an attempt to establish a democratic political framework.

Ethnicity in Africa is often understood as something essentially related to the autonomy of peoples and their cultures. Ironically, the new order in Ethiopia gave rise to "politicized ethnicity" as all the ethnic groups (or the "nations, nationalities and peoples" according to the official term) must be recognized by and work with the ruling party.

This paper tries to explain the ambiguous relationship between the state system and ethnicity in contemporary Ethiopia through a study of the history of Silte people. Traditionally, the Silte are a Muslim people sharing perceived genealogical ties. They are the descendants of a Muslim leader who participated in the historic military expedition against Christian Abyssinia in the 16th century. However, after the political and economic incorporation of the Silte into the modern Ethiopian state in the late 19th century, they have emerged as part of the Gurage people, who were recognized as the most industrious "ethnic group" among the Ethiopian nationals. Finally, under the federal state system, the ruling party recognized the Silte as a "nationality" totally distinct from the Gurage.

The Gurage were often seen as an ethnic group with strong solidarity, but their emergence was closely related to the state ideology of the 20th century Ethiopia. In other words, the Gurage were "created" as the bearer of the national economy of modern Ethiopia. On the other hand, the formation of contemporary Silte identity was not totally dictated by the state authority. Rather, it was a sort of hegemonic process in which the state ideology interplays with people's activities, resulting in the formation of a new "nationality".

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PostPosted: Sun Sep 17, 2006 5:19 pm Reply with quote
nur23_You55ouf
Joined: 14 Jun 2006
Posts: 18
Location: U.S.




I'm not sure entirely but i've seen from wikipedia that harar descended from an axum military outpost. It's logical to think the original or pure hararis of today represent the habesha population of ethiopia. Harari, tigre, and amharic stem from the ancient language Geez. I've also heard hararis descended from a south arabian people that crossed the red sea, but the same can be said for the other semitic speaking groups of eritrea and ethiopia.

I personally believe it's best to get such info from the best source, which is a harari elder.
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PostPosted: Sun Sep 17, 2006 9:08 pm Reply with quote
nur23_You55ouf
Joined: 14 Jun 2006
Posts: 18
Location: U.S.




If you're wondering how exactly hararis share a common ancestor with the tigrays and amharas i'll tell you.


Habesha is a term reffering to the peoples who crossed the red sea into northern ethiopia/eritrea correct? Those people are known to be the sabean people who originated from Yemen. Keep in mind scientific evidence also shows sabaean influence in the regions of ethiopia and eritrea to be very small, and the migration could have been from ethiopia to Yemen, and not the other way around. Anyways after intermarriage, and cultural assimilations between the indeginous and the sabaeans, the Geez language formed. Now moving straightforward to what this has to do with harar. When Mohhamad (peace be upon him) came to ethiopia for refuge from the arabs who wanted to persecte him, King Negus accepted him and converted. The ones who followed Mohammad and converted to Islam at axum are known as the hararis of today. Because of the christian atmosphere in Axum at the time, the original hararis left axum to move southward where great land of harar lies. Mr. Green

Of course the harari population will be different now because of ormo, somali, turkish, arab, tigray, pakistani, amhara and all these other foreign peoples moving into the city for various reasons.
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PostPosted: Sun Sep 17, 2006 11:29 pm Reply with quote
malasay
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Location: Texas




nur23_You55ouf wrote:
When Mohhamad (peace be upon him) came to ethiopia for refuge from the arabs who wanted to persecte him, King Negus accepted him and converted. The ones who followed Mohammad and converted to Islam at axum are known as the hararis of today. Because of the christian atmosphere in Axum at the time, the original hararis left axum to move southward where great land of harar lies.


The Prophet Mohammed (SAW) never migrated to habasha. It was his companions that did so, including his cousin - Ja'far Ibn Abu Talib. Harar was already settled at that time, and reported to be the first city to accept Isalm after Madina.

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PostPosted: Mon Sep 18, 2006 12:04 am Reply with quote
nur23_You55ouf
Joined: 14 Jun 2006
Posts: 18
Location: U.S.




malasay wrote:
nur23_You55ouf wrote:
When Mohhamad (peace be upon him) came to ethiopia for refuge from the arabs who wanted to persecte him, King Negus accepted him and converted. The ones who followed Mohammad and converted to Islam at axum are known as the hararis of today. Because of the christian atmosphere in Axum at the time, the original hararis left axum to move southward where great land of harar lies.


The Prophet Mohammed (SAW) never migrated to habasha. It was his companions that did so, including his cousin - Ja'far Ibn Abu Talib. Harar was already settled at that time, and reported to be the first city to accept Isalm after Madina.


my mistake. Embarassed
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PostPosted: Sun May 27, 2007 7:50 pm Reply with quote
nur23_You55ouf
Joined: 14 Jun 2006
Posts: 18
Location: U.S.




The following should offer some interesting insight:

"At least seven settlements are mentioned as the precursors of Harar according to a popular legend. These were Esshkani gey, Fereka gey, Hararwe gey, Hassen gey, Ruhuk gey, Sammit gey and Tuhkun gey. All these sites are now awaiting archaeological excavation, exept Hassen gey, which still keeps the name north of Harar. These settlements resolved their enmity and agreed to establish their centre in Harar."




"Settlements in the region are believed to have existed some 1200 years back and the tribe is identified as Punt tribe, from which the Hararis are believed to have emerged. Different settlement site are postulated around Harar, such as Dakar, Malka, before the establishment of the walled city of Harar some 10 centuries ago. Though Harar town is refereed to as a medieval town, (after the construction of the wall) the city was established some 1000 years back. A simple proof is the age of the "Jumma Meskid"1 of Harar town which is over 800 years old or perhaps more and believed to have been built during the reign of Awe Abadir. The fact that such a huge mosque was built, indicates that there was demand for it i.e. it was needed to accommodate the people already living in the town. The size of the mosque indicates the existence of the town long before the construction of the Jumma Mosque for Friday prayer, as the rule of Islam, such a mosque is not required for people living in scattered settlement. Hence, from this facts, it is not difficult to conclude that Harar town existed before 1000 years, before the expansion and growth of Harar to became the capital of the then national government. According to some legend, there is a saying of the "Sati Geyach"2 which is an indication that there were similar settlements around Harar before Harar attained the status of a center of political decision, center of learning, and commerce with a link to the trade route between the Zeyla port to the west and south of Harar as far as the Bale region. "


Last edited by nur23_You55ouf on Sun May 27, 2007 8:26 pm; edited 1 time in total
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PostPosted: Sun May 27, 2007 8:25 pm Reply with quote
nur23_You55ouf
Joined: 14 Jun 2006
Posts: 18
Location: U.S.




malasay wrote:
That's an interesting question. I have heard different theories about where Hararis originated from. Insha'Allah will address that soon.

However, historically Hararis have intermarried with Muslims from different part of Ethiopia as well as the world.

For example i have somali and arab blood thru my mom's side, and tigre blood thru my dad's side... or that is what i have been told. But I'm 100% Malasay Idea


I guess no one really knows who the pure harari is. Sad

I wouldn't be surprised if every harari had some degree of mixture. I myself have turkish and somali (isaaq) blood.

I prefer considering myself 100% harari. Laughing
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